Building Millennial Loyalty with Content Strategies (Part 5)

Millennial loyalty is within reach, but the key is using content strategically in order to connect with your audience on a personal level.

In May, my new book, Marketing to Millennials for Dummies will be available online and in-stores. (You can also pre-order the book today!) While the idea of marketing to Millennials can be more broadly understood as marketing to a modern consumer, there are certain traits that have been established with the Millennial demographic specifically, and have slowly begun to expand to other cohorts. As such, I am publishing a five-part series discussing the strategic use of content in the pursuit of building loyalty with Millennials (and modern consumers, in general). In this final part, we will take a closer look at how marketers can build Millennial loyalty with conversational content.

Marketing to Millennials For Dummies Corey Padveen

Get Conversational

Your content should entice your Millennial audience to participate in a conversation. This doesn’t mean that you need to avoid your sales pitch at all costs; you simply need to be smart about when and how it is integrated into your messaging. Millennials will spend money, despite what you might have read, but they will spend it at their own discretion. This means that the aggressive sales tactic on new media will not only fall flat (leading you to spend marketing dollars that lead nowhere) but it also means that your brand will leave no lasting impression on your targeted Millennial audience segment. Instead of building relationships and loyalty, you’ll need to run ongoing brand awareness campaigns that target the same audiences, and this is simply a waste of resources in the long-run. Conversational, authentic content is the remedy for this problem.

There are three stages of an initial content strategy: education, differentiation, and motivation. In the education stage, you’re teaching your audience about the industry you’re in and the products or services that are available (some of which you might offer). This provides value to your audience (the first strategy we covered) and builds trust through conversation and content sharing. The differentiation stage is where you’ll highlight why your products or services are better. This is most effectively done by sharing third party content or engaging with existing customers to highlight that it is not simply your own opinion which places your product or service above the rest, but the market opinion.

The last stage, motivation, is the point in the conversation where you can implement some traditional sales tactics. Motivate your now engaged audience to take action by offering some sort of incentive. That can be a discount, a special for first-time customers, or another incentivized offer that leads to those members of your Millennial audience that are ready to buy to take action. The key throughout this entire process is to make it an ongoing conversation. Engage with users on either an individual or large-scale basis. Talk to them on a personal level as opposed to simply sharing marketing materials. Ask questions and let your audience know that they are being heard. Millennials have seen enough advertising content. Converse with them by following this outlined path and you’ll see conversions and loyalty start to ramp up.

I hope you found this series helpful, and for more strategies on reaching and marketing to Millennials, don’t forget to pre-order your copy of Marketing to Millennials for Dummies on Amazon today, available May 15!

Building Millennial Loyalty with Content Strategies (Part 4)

Millennial loyalty might seem like a myth based on popular misconceptions, but the reality is that Millennials can be your most loyal audience if you leverage content correctly.

In May, my new book, Marketing to Millennials for Dummies will be available online and in-stores. (You can also pre-order the book today!) While the idea of marketing to Millennials can be more broadly understood as marketing to a modern consumer, there are certain traits that have been established with the Millennial demographic specifically, and have slowly begun to expand to other cohorts. As such, I am publishing a five-part series discussing the strategic use of content in the pursuit of building loyalty with Millennials (and modern consumers, in general). This series will run until next week as we prepare for the launch of our new website and the book. In this part, we will take a closer look at what kinds of content drive up your Millennial loyalty the fastest.

Marketing to Millennials For Dummies Corey Padveen

Rich and Digestible Content

Rich and easily digestible are two qualities that might not necessarily go together all that well in the world of dining, but when it comes to marketing, the more your content possesses these two qualities, the more successful it will be at driving your Millennial relationships forward. Rich media are defined as pieces of content that leverage delivery methods beyond standard text. So, for example, an image or a video would count as forms of rich media. These are the types of content that your Millennial audience will be most attracted to, and they are the ones that will most effectively and rapidly deliver your message.

In terms of making your content more digestible, the key to doing so is thinking about simplicity when you craft your message. You’ll want your brand experience (or buyer journey) to be fluid and clear, and you’ll want your messaging to be short, to the point, and genuine. Authenticity (discussed in the final strategy, which follows next week) is key to the digestibility of your content. If Millennials can come across your content where it is presented in a way that makes it simple, eye-catching, and conversational (again, covered in the final strategy, which will be available next week) then the likelihood that they will engage with it is increased significantly. That is especially true if you’ve followed the previously outlined strategy of making the content personalized to the audience segment that you’re trying to reach.

By using rich media and developing a simple enough message that your content can be digested easily by Millennial consumers, you increase the chances that ongoing engagement can be derived from a particular segment of your audience. Ongoing engagement means getting users to return as you produce more content that follows similar patterns. As with any of these strategies, that ongoing engagement is crucial in the nurturing and strengthening of your Millennial relationships. Those relationships provide the very strong basis for loyalty.

If you take advantage of the value of rich media, you can significantly drive up your Millennial audience loyalty. Be sure to keep an eye out next week for the final content strategy I cover regarding the value of a conversation. And don’t forget to pre-order your copy of Marketing to Millennials for Dummies on Amazon today!

Building Millennial Loyalty with Content Strategies (Part 3)

You can drive Millennial loyalty by implementing some carefully crafted content strategies.

In May, my new book, Marketing to Millennials for Dummies will be available online and in-stores. (You can also pre-order the book today!) While the idea of marketing to Millennials can be more broadly understood as marketing to a modern consumer, there are certain traits that have been established with the Millennial demographic specifically, and have slowly begun to expand to other cohorts. As such, I am publishing a five-part series discussing the strategic use of content in the pursuit of building loyalty with Millennials (and modern consumers, in general). This series will run over the next few weeks as we prepare for the launch of our new website and the book. In this part, we will take a closer look at how marketers can personalize the experience for Millennials, and how value drives loyalty with your audience.

Marketing to Millennials For Dummies Corey Padveen

Personalize Each Segment’s Content

Personalizing the content you share to Millennial audience segments is a two-step process. The first involves segmenting your audience of Millennials using one or several of many (often free) tools that are available to marketers. While this process could easily be a series of articles on its own (and a process that I cover in fairly extensive detail in my book, Marketing to Millennials for Dummies) it suffices to say, in this case, that you could conduct this segmentation process by using Facebook’s Audience Analysis tool on your email lists and identify segments based on interests and behaviors. In this segmentation process, one of the important factors that you’ll want to keep on the lookout for are the expressed (or implied, based on likes and engagement with other brands on Facebook) interests that your audience possesses. These interests will allow you to get a better understanding of what makes your Millennial audience segments tick, which will allow for extensive customization of your messaging.

Customization of your content is an important strategy because of the almost overwhelming amount of noise that exists online. Your audience can simply be too easily distracted by something else in a timeline or news feed to pay attention to your generic content. It needs to speak to your Millennial audience on a personal level, which will accomplish a number of objectives. First, personalized content will catch your audience’s initial attention. Once you have that, the more personalized the message, the longer your audience will be willing to stick around for it. The average attention span of online adults is only a handful of seconds. If you want to extend that, think customization first. Lastly, personalized content will lead to faster relationship development and nurturing. The closer you can get to your Millennials, as noted in the previous strategy, the more loyal they will be and the greater their lifetime value becomes.  

By focusing your efforts on creating personalized, highly engaging content for each of your audience pockets, Millennial loyalty will be a much more attainable objective. Be sure to keep an eye out next week for the second content strategy I cover regarding the types of content that are best suited for building Millennial loyalty. And don’t forget to pre-order your copy of Marketing to Millennials for Dummies on Amazon today!

Building Millennial Loyalty with Content Strategies (Part 2)

Millennial loyalty is not a myth; with the right content strategies in place, you can build an audience of loyal Millennial consumers with a high lifetime value.

In May, my new book, Marketing to Millennials for Dummies will be available online and in-stores. (You can also pre-order the book today!) While the idea of marketing to Millennials can be more broadly understood as marketing to a modern consumer, there are certain traits that have been established with the Millennial demographic specifically, and have slowly begun to expand to other cohorts. As such, I am publishing a five-part series discussing the strategic use of content in the pursuit of building loyalty with Millennials (and modern consumers, in general). This series will run over the next few weeks as we prepare for the launch of our new website and the book. In this part, we will take a closer look at how marketers can add value to their audience, and how value drives loyalty with Millennials.

Marketing to Millennials For Dummies Corey Padveen

Providing Value

Value comes in many forms. In some cases – likely the one most marketers immediately assume when they hear the term ‘value’ – it can mean economic value. Examples of economic value are coupons or specials that might be offered to fans, followers, and subscribers. The value referred to in this particular strategic initiative, however, is somewhat different. When you’re trying to connect with Millennials, you’ll want your content to contain some type of value that stretches beyond a one-off deal or offer. You’ll want there to be a sustainable form of value that keeps your audience coming back.

There are several different types of content that offer this sustainable value. Most of these come in the form of knowledge. If you can educate your audience in some capacity that leaves them with something more (and lasting) that they did not have before, you’re in an excellent position to build those lasting relationships that keep Millennials coming back for more. In terms of the kinds of educational content that Millennials are most often attracted to, you’ll want to consider three types: informational, instructional, and inspirational.

Informational content is rooted in the explanation of theories, concepts, and other brand- or industry-related concepts. When you share informational content, you are providing your audience with the stepping stones needed to become their own experts in a given subject. Let’s say, for example, you’re in the gambling business, and you’re sharing information about the kinds of bets that exist in the casino table game of craps. In order to do this in the most effective way to drive continued traffic, you’ll create content (which can be in virtually any form, be it written, video or audio; though, the latter two are worth more of your effort) on an ongoing basis and share it with your audience on various media.

Creating and sharing this content will lead to continued engagement from your most interested targets. An added benefit to this strategy is the fact that it highlights your own expertise in the field, which is a similar benefit derived from instructional content.

In the case of instructional content, you’re providing value by walking your audience through the necessary steps to taking some sort of action. This could be anything from a simple outline of the steps to signing up for a service or newsletter to something more complex, like a do-it-yourself video that provides viewers with the intricate steps involved in building a car engine. Whatever the case, this is a content strategy that once again showcases your expertise, builds trust with your audience by giving them a form of insider information, and drives continued engagement through the sustainable value of the instructions you’re providing.

Lastly, you have inspirational content. In this particular case, the use of the term inspirational doesn’t relate to motivational phrases, but rather the content is inspirational in terms of the elicited actions. You can inspire your audience to try something new and different, and the best way to do this is to provide tips and tricks that might not be particularly obvious when you share, say, the standard instructions involved in a particular act. Again, this is a content type that drives repeat engagement and provides your audience with a considerable degree of value. Of course, there are those pieces of content that provide economic value, such as a deal or offer, but in the case where you’ll want to build a long-term relationship, which is where brand loyalty lies, the types of content the associated value outlined here are the ones to which you’ll want to pay the closest attention.

When you focus your efforts on providing a sustained, long-term value to your audience, you’ll be in a much better position to build Millennial loyalty. Be sure to keep an eye out next week for the second content strategy I cover regarding the personalization of your content efforts. And don’t forget to pre-order your copy of Marketing to Millennials for Dummies on Amazon today!

Building Millennial Loyalty with Content Strategies (Part 1)

There is a common misconception among marketers that Millennial loyalty is notoriously fickle. The right content strategies can mean life-loyal, highly engaged audience.

In May, my new book, Marketing to Millennials for Dummies will be available online and in-stores. (You can also pre-order the book today!) While the idea of marketing to Millennials can be more broadly understood as marketing to a modern consumer, there are certain traits that have been established with the Millennial demographic specifically, and have slowly begun to expand to other cohorts. As such, I am publishing a five-part series discussing the strategic use of content in the pursuit of building loyalty with Millennials (and modern consumers, in general). This series will run over the next few weeks as we prepare for the launch of our new website and the book. We will begin first by looking at the reality that marketers face when it comes to reaching Millennials and getting them to buy into both a product and, perhaps more importantly, a brand.

Marketing to Millennials For Dummies Corey Padveen

Understanding Millennials

Contrary to what many think, Millennials are actually more loyal than any generation that came before them. Moreover, Millennials have the potential to be worth more on an individual basis over the course of their lifetime. This goes against another common misconception that Millennials are price sensitive and hesitant to spend any money. While they might be price sensitive in some regards, they will spend their money and stay loyal to a brand if: a) they feel as though there is a significant degree of economic utility in their expenditure, and b) they have developed a relationship with a brand on a personal level.

You might only need to achieve two conditions in order to build that sought-after loyalty from Millennials, but they are not necessarily all that easily reached. You might read about campaigns or initiatives that have succeeded at driving Millennial engagement and conversion, but when it comes to loyalty, there is one strategic asset that will stand out above the rest: content. Developing effective, objective-oriented content strategies will help you connect with your target Millennial audience on a personal level, which will build those long-lasting relationships that lead to conversion, high lifetime value, and long-term loyalty.

Content is a fairly broad term. It comes in many shapes and sizes, and it differs from one medium or communications avenue to the next. While some aspects of your content might change, the strategies outlined in this series are designed to build strong relationships with your targeted Millennials, regardless of the platform on which these strategies are implemented. There are a few keys to remember when it comes to Millennials, however, and keeping these assumptions and realities top of mind while reviewing the strategies in the upcoming series will be very helpful in developing effective loyalty strategies for your target Millennial audience. Those points are as follows:

  • Millennials are not interested in being sold to aggressively on conversational media
  • Your audience is more interested in a relationship and an experience than a one-off sale or offer
  • Don’t take the last point to mean that a one-off sale or offer is not a valid option to drive initial engagement; it is
  • Millennials are interested in access over ownership
  • Millennials will spend money, but they want to see how utility factors into the transaction over superficial value
  • A loyal Millennial is worth more than a high-spending passive customer

With these assumptions top of mind, you will be in a better position to make the most of the loyalty-building strategies covered in this series. Be sure to keep an eye out next week for the first content strategy I cover. And don’t forget to pre-order your copy of Marketing to Millennials for Dummies on Amazon today!